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Empowered Women Empower Women

Tuesday, March 1st, 2022

“Each time a woman stands up for herself, without knowing it possibly, without claiming it, she stands up for all women.” – Maya Angelou 

Happy March, readers! Before we get further, I wanted to acknowledge the distress in the world right now. Be strong, and safe, wherever you are. 

Beau Weasley here, encouraging you all to enjoy the spring and recognize the wonders of women this Women’s History Month. Here’s a compilation of memoirs about empowered women, written by empowering women:

  • Becoming Odyssa: Adventures on the Appalachian Trail by Jennifer Pharr Davis

After graduating from college, Jennifer isn’t sure what she wants to do with her life. She is drawn to the Appalachian Trail, a 2175-mile footpath that stretches from Georgia to Maine. Though her friends and family think she’s crazy, she sets out alone to hike the trail, hoping it will give her time to think about what she wants to do next. With every step she takes, Jennifer transitions from an over-confident college graduate to a student of the trail, braving situations she never imagined before her thru-hike. The trail is full of unexpected kindness, generosity, and humor. And when tragedy strikes, she learns that she can depend on other people to help her in times of need.

  • Know My Name by Chanel Miller 

*SA trigger warning

Known as Emily Doe to the world, Chanel Miller reclaims her identity to tell her story of trauma, transcendence, and the power of words. Know My Name will forever transform the way we think about sexual assault, challenging our beliefs about what is acceptable and speaking truth to the tumultuous reality of healing. Entwining pain, resilience, and humor, this memoir will stand as a modern classic.

  • Floreana by Margret Wittmer

The remarkable first-hand account of Margret Wittmer, who settled the island of Floreana in the Galapagos—600 miles from the mainland of Ecuador. It took Wittmer and her family weeks to travel to the island in 1932; they battled with the ties for three full days before they could land. Five months pregnant when she arrived, Wittmer found the beauty of the tropical island constantly tempered by the traumas of attempting everyday life in a wild and lonely spot. From the mysterious disappearance of a stranger linked to another recluse on the island, to a missed opportunity to meet President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the 56 years recalled in this memoir are full of exotic adventures and the joys and tragedies of a lifetime.

  • Lost and Found by Kathryn Schultz

Eighteen months before Kathryn Schulz’s beloved father died, she met the woman she would marry. In Lost & Found, she weaves the stories of those relationships into a brilliant exploration of how all our lives are shaped by loss and discovery—from the maddening disappearance of everyday objects to the sweeping devastations of war, pandemic, and natural disaster; from finding new planets to falling in love. The resulting book is part memoir, part guidebook to living in a world that is simultaneously full of wonder and joy and wretchedness and suffering—a world that always demands both our gratitude and our grief.

  • Called Again: A Story of Love and Triumph by Jennifer Pharr Davis

In 2011, Jennifer Pharr Davis became the overall record holder on the Appalachian Trail. By hiking 2,181 miles in 46 days – an average of 47 miles per day – she became the first female to ever set that mark. But this is not a book about records or numbers; this is a book about endurance and faith, and most of all love.  The most amazing part of this story is not found at the finish, but is discovered through the many challenges, lessons and relationships that present themselves along the trail. This is Jennifer’s story, in her own words, about how she started this journey with a love for hiking and more significantly a love for her husband Brew. By completing this extraordinary amateur feat, Jennifer rose above the culture of multi-million dollar sports contracts that is marked by shortcuts and steroids. This is the story of a real person doing something remarkable. Jennifer Pharr Davis is a modern role-model for women – and men. She is an authentic hero.

  • I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban by Malala Yousafzai

When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley in Pakistan, one girl spoke out. Malala Yousafzai refused to be silenced and fought for her right to an education. On Tuesday, October 9, 2012, when she was fifteen, she almost paid the ultimate price. She was shot in the head at point-blank range while riding the bus home from school, and few expected her to survive. I AM MALALA is the remarkable tale of a family uprooted by global terrorism, of the fight for girls’ education, and of brave parents who have a fierce love for their daughter in a society that prizes sons. I AM MALALA will make you believe in the power of one person’s voice to inspire change in the world.

  • School Choice: A Legacy to Keep by Virginia Walden Ford

On a cold winter night in February of 1967, a large rock shattered a bedroom window in Virginia Walden Ford’s home in Little Rock, Arkansas, landing in her baby sister’s crib. Outside, members of the Ku Klux Klan burned a cross on her family’s lawn. Faceless bigots were terrorizing Virginia, her parents, and her sisters–all because her father, Harry Fowler, dared to take a job as the assistant superintendent of personnel for the Little Rock School District. He was more than qualified, but he was Black. In her searing new memoir, legendary school choice advocate Virginia Walden Ford recounts the lessons she learned as a child in the segregated south. School Choice: A Legacy to Keep, tells the dramatic true story of how poor D.C. parents, with the support of unlikely allies, faced off against some of America’s most prominent politicians—and won a better future for children.

  • I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou

Here is a book as joyous and painful, as mysterious and memorable, as childhood itself. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings captures the longing of lonely children, the brute insult of bigotry, and the wonder of words that can make the world right. Maya Angelou’s debut memoir is a modern American classic beloved worldwide.

While these books are representative, they are not all-encompassing. I encourage you, reader, to utilize Women’s History Month and reflect–on often overlooked accomplishments, on women’s empowerment, and reflect on how you can be the change you want to see in the world.

Beau Weasley, signing off!

Books x Bastille

Friday, February 18th, 2022

Dearest Readers,

Let me set the scene: It’s 2013–the sun is shining, you’re wearing way too many layered t-shirts, and “Pompeii” by Bastille is blasting on the radio for the fourth time that hour. 

No? Just me?

Luckily for all of us, “Pompeii” did not follow in the tradition of one-hit wonders and was just the first of many great hits released by the English pop rock band. Their latest album, Give Me the Future, released a couple weeks ago and includes their most recent hit, “Shut Off the Lights.

Now, what does any of this have to do with books?

A lot, actually! Not only does Give Me the Future explore Bastille’s own musings on technology, reality, and how the two interact, it’s also chock-full of references to some exceptional science fiction books! The books (and my musings on them) can be found below!

1984 by George Orwell

Perhaps the most famous of the referenced books, 1984 paints a dystopian future in which government is totalitarian and surveillance is omnipresent. It follows Winston Smith, a lowly worker employed to rewrite historical documents who desperately wishes to overthrow the government. Orwell wrote 1984 as a warning against propaganda, regimentation, and the erasure of history, and many terms used in the book, most notably “Big Brother,” have become a part of our regular lexicon.

Island by Aldous Huxley

Writing in direct contrast to his own novel Brave New World, Aldous Huxley crafts the idea of the ultimate utopia in his book Island. In Island, Englishman Will Farnaby deliberately wrecks his ship in order to gain entry to the Kingdom of Pala, located on an island between Sumatra and the Andaman Islands. The society he finds there is utopic, with a culture that blends western science and eastern Buddhism, values multifaceted education, and believes the key to overcoming suffering and death is to live wholly in the moment. 

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick

Philip K. Dick’s novel, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, also known by its revised title Blade Runner, is an exploration of morality and what it actually means to be human. The book follows Rick Deckard, a bounty hunter assigned to “retire” androids who have escaped from Mars and fled to Earth. In his hunt for the androids, Deckard comes to learn that the androids are almost entirely indistinguishable from organic human beings and that both have been killed in the process.

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley 

In addition to Island, we have another reference to a Huxley work, this time to his work of dystopian fiction, Brave New World. This story examines a future in which humans are engineered in artificial wombs and later sorted into predetermined castes based on their intelligence and work. Natural-born humans are viewed as “savages” and live in exile on reservations around the world.

Total Recall by Piers Anthony

Based on the story, “We Can Remember It for You Wholesale,” by Philip K. Dick, Total Recall blurs the line between dreams and reality. When Douglas Quail, the novel’s protagonist, is having a fake memory installed, he discovers that the nightmares he’s been having of covert missions on Mars are his true memories that have been repressed by his employers. His life is completely overturned and he is left to question all that he believed to be true.

These are but a few of the incredible books that make the science fiction genre so compelling. If you’re wanting sci-fi that’s a touch more recent and/or diverse, I highly recommend checking out the works of Ursula K. Le Guin, Octavia Butler, Becky Chambers, and Nnedi Okorafor, to name a few.

Happy Reading!

Judy Beaulume

5 of the Best Romance Series to Curl Up With

Friday, February 11th, 2022

With a few more weeks of winter heading our way, Beau Weasley predicts the forecast will be staying inside with a book (or four). Here is a list of recent romance series to help keep you warm at night!

Heart of the Duke Series by Christi Caldwell

for-love-of-the-duke-cover

For the Love of the Duke is the first book in the series. After the tragic death of his wife, Jasper, the 8th Duke of Bainbridge, buried himself away in the dark cold walls of his home, Castle Blackwood. When he’s coaxed out of his self-imposed exile to attend the amusements of the Frost Fair, his life is irrevocably changed by his fateful meeting with Lady Katherine Adamson.

With her tight brown ringlets and silly white-ruffled gowns, Lady Katherine Adamson has found her dance card empty for two Seasons. After her father’s passing, Katherine learned the unreliability of men and is determined to depend on no one, except herself. Until she meets Jasper…

In a desperate bid to avoid a match arranged by her family, Katherine makes the Duke of Bainbridge a shocking proposition—one that he accepts.

Only, as Katherine begins to love Jasper, she finds the arrangement agreed upon is not enough. And Jasper is left to decide if protecting his heart is more important than fighting for Katherine’s love.

The English Brothers Series by Kate Regnery

Breaking Up with Barrett is the first book about the Philadelphia-based, wildly handsome English brothers who are all on the lookout for love.

Barrett English, aka “the Shark,” is the fair-haired, first-born of the English brothers, and the CEO of the oldest, most prestigious investment banking firm in Philadelphia. He rules the boardroom with an iron fist, refusing to take no for an answer and always getting his way.

Emily Edwards, a first-year doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania, grew up in the gatehouse on the outskirts of Barrett’s childhood estate. The daughter of his family’s gardener and housekeeper, she was always looking through the window of privilege but forced to remember her place at the very periphery of the kingdom.

When business partners suggest that a fiancée might soften Barrett’s image over business dinners, he approaches Emily for the “job” of fiancée. And while love wasn’t necessarily on Barrett’s radar, he begins to realize that Emily always has been. But will his take-no-prisoners boardroom tactics work on the heart of the woman he loves?

Best Kept Secrets Series by Kandi Steiner

The first novel in this series is called What He Doesn’t Know

On the northeast side of town, there is a house. 

The house was once magical, filled with love and joy and plans for the future. Inside its walls are many things that belong to me — my books, the china from my mother on my wedding day, the beautiful cage once home to two birds, now empty, just like me.

And a man.

A man who also belongs to me.

A man I no longer wish to keep.

A man who, no doubt, has not slept, though the sun is rising. Because the house where he waits is where I laid my head to rest every night for eight years. Until last night.

No one who knows me would believe Charlie Pierce, the quiet, bookish girl who never made waves is pulling out of the driveway of a man who isn’t her husband. But they don’t know me at all.

I don’t even know me. Not anymore.

They say there are two sides to every story, and I suppose in most cases, that’s true. But the one I live inside of? It has three.

On the northeast side of town, there is a house.

But there is no longer a home.

London Celebrities Series by Lucy Parker

Act Like It is the first book in the series.

This just in: romance takes center stage as West End theatre’s Richard Troy steps out with none other than castmate Elaine Graham

Richard Troy used to be the hottest actor in London, but the only thing firing up lately is his temper. We all love to love a bad boy, but Richard’s antics have made him Enemy Number One, breaking the hearts of fans across the city.

Have the tides turned? Has English-rose Lainie Graham made him into a new man? Sources say the mismatched pair has been spotted at multiple events, arm in arm and hip to hip. From fits of jealousy to longing looks and heated whispers, onlookers are stunned by this blooming romance.

Could the rumors be right? Could this unlikely romance be the real thing? Or are these gifted stage actors playing us all?

CONTENT WARNINGS: mention of childhood cancer and past death of a family member, past suicide, sexual assault. 


Transcend Series by Jewel E. Ann

Transcend is the first book in the series.

“In another life, she was my forever.” 

An unexpected tragedy leaves Professor Nathaniel Hunt a widower alone with a newborn baby. 

He hires a nanny. She’s young, but well-qualified, with a simple life, a crazy name obsession, and a boyfriend she met at the grocery store. 

Over time, he discovers she knows things about him—things that happened before she was born—like a hidden scar on his head, his favorite pizza, and how he cheated on a high school Spanish test. 

She speaks familiar words and shares haunting memories that take him back to over two decades earlier when he lost his best friend in a tragic accident. 

“I’m afraid of what’s going to happen when you realize I’m not her.”

Transcend is a sexy, mind-bending journey that uncovers possibilities, challenges beliefs, and begets the age-old question: is there life after death?

As Valentine’s Day comes and goes, don’t forget to treat yourshelves, too…

Happy Reading!

Beau Weasley

Hello from a Beaufort Intern!

Friday, February 11th, 2022

Hello everyone! Beaufort’s fourth spring intern checking in!

A little about me…

I was born and raised in West Michigan, where a love for snow is required and yearning for warmth is nearly always present. I have three younger siblings, one sister and two brothers, and incredibly supportive parents who have always encouraged me to pursue my dreams! In December of 2021, I graduated from Grand Valley State University with a B.S. in Political Science, and I am now, with great excitement, on a journey to establish a career in publishing!

For as long as I can remember, I’ve had an extreme passion for books. My happy place has always been curled up in my bed devouring a compelling novel. However, up until recently, I thought that my love for reading couldn’t be turned into a career, but instead, would forever remain a beloved hobby. I was set on a career in politics, but through multiple experiences, I realized that the political world isn’t where I’m meant to be. This realization sent me back to the theoretical career drawing board, and here I am now, eagerly exploring the publishing industry!

As far as books go, some of my favorites are Twilight by Stephenie Meyer; Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert; and It Ends with Us by Colleen Hoover. I am a sucker for a story that makes you laugh, cry, and, most importantly, feel like you are living the lives of its characters. I want to bring more books like that into the world, which is why I am so excited and thankful that I get to learn about the book publishing process through my internship!

I can’t wait to see what these next few months at Beaufort hold, and I am eager to share my journey with you!

Until next time,

Beaulla Swan

Greetings!

Friday, February 4th, 2022

Hello there! 

Another Beaufort intern here, under the nom-de-plume Catherine Beaushaw because Wuthering Heights is an exceptional classic that holds such a warm place in my heart. 

I can’t even begin to describe how excited I am to be interning at Beaufort this semester. Everyone here is so incredibly sweet, which makes complete sense because book people are simply the best. As for me, I’m a UCLA grad with a B.A. in Sociology currently living in sunny San Diego with my lovely cat and little poodle. When I’m not reading, you can find me rollerblading down the Mission Beach boardwalk or heading for a run along Sunset Cliffs. (I’m so grateful I got to grow up here!) 

It’s been my dream to break into book publishing for some time now. I’ve always been an avid reader, and I find such joy in discovering those books that truly speak to your heart. It’s why I want to be a part of the process of finding pieces that connect to other readers in that special way as well. I was working my way into the industry back in 2019, but my path took a little detour when the pandemic hit. Graduating into 2020 was, without a doubt, extremely tough. I had to put my dream of working with books to the side and focus on finding ways to support myself during that super crazy year. 

I was convinced I needed to give up on book publishing, but after a recent visit back to New York City, I felt inspired and decided to give my dream another shot. Lo and behold, I was given the amazing opportunity to intern at Beaufort Books. It’s my dream to eventually make the move from here in San Diego (although a gorgeous place to be) back to New York City to be amongst its neverending energy and all the fellow book lovers. Have you ever seen all the people reading books on the subway? I hope the NYC subway system continues to have absolutely terrible WiFi–that way, I’ll keep seeing people passing the time with a great book. Because reading is what connects us, brings us joy, and inspires change. 

I’m excited and incredibly hopeful for what the next couple of months have in store. 

Catherine Beaushaw

New Year, Same Pandemic

Friday, February 4th, 2022

Hello everyone! 

My name is Beau Weasley, I am just one of Beaufort’s four new interns for the Spring! If you couldn’t already tell, I am a wildly huge Harry Potter fan. I’m a die-hard Ravenclaw (contrary to the name), and–although I’m reluctant to admit it–my patronus is a Salmon. I like to think it means I’m trustworthy, charismatic, a leader… Or it’s just a fish. Who’s to say? My graduation present to myself when I graduate is actually going to be a Harry Potter-inspired tattoo (I have 8 already). 

With that, I’m currently in my last year of graduate school, receiving my Master’s degree in Book Publishing this June! I graduated from Arizona State University with a degree in English and a minor in Film Production in May of 2020 (Yikes, I know.), and made the move to Oregon that September. I strongly do not recommend moving to a different state in the middle of a global pandemic–BUT! It was totally worth it. Starting in a new city, almost entirely isolated was a whole new ballgame I wasn’t completely ready for, but grad school was.

When I was sixteen, one of my high school teachers asked what I wanted to major in in college. I quickly responded, “English, probably, but I have no idea what I would do with that.” Her answer changed my life. Literally.

“What about something with book publishing?”

And that was my plan from that moment on. When I was studying abroad in Manchester, England my sophomore year of undergrad, I read a book that featured a main character who got her master’s in Book Publishing. I was so overwhelmed with excitement and passion because I had no idea that was even an option and did all the research I could to find out more.

Now, I’m in Oregon, and my plans are coming to an end, or, rather, being caught up with. My dream is to head east for a change and end up working for a bigger publishing company in New York, but real plans? Guess we’ll see.

Happy to have you here, and to be able to share my thoughts along the way!

Beau Weasley

Salutations!

Thursday, February 3rd, 2022

Dear Readers,

Hello and Happy Lunar New Year! Judy BEAUlume here—one of Beaufort Books’ newest interns and an insatiable bibliophile!

A little about me: I’m originally from Dallas, Texas where I grew up with my wonderful parents, one younger brother, and many, many pets! Through the years, my family has had lizards, turtles, a cockatiel, a cat, a tarantula (rescued from our swimming pool), and many, many wonderful dogs. My love of reading started very young (thank you Mom!) and some of my favorite childhood series included Gregor the Overlander by Suzanne Collins, Percy Jackson by Rick Riordan, and Chasing Vermeer by Blue Balliett!

Nowadays, I live in NYC where I work at a bookstore, intern with Beaufort Books, and read as many books on the subway as I possibly can! Some of my favorite authors include TJ Klune, Erin Morgenstern, Casey McQuiston, and Neil Gaiman. I’m currently finishing up the Poppy War Trilogy by R. F. Kuang which I highly recommend to anyone who loves history, fantasy, or Avatar the Last Airbender.

When I’m not reading, I also love watching animated movies/tv shows, doodling, listening to fictional podcasts (if you haven’t listened to The Magnus Archives, you absolutely should!), and taking dance classes! I strongly dislike asparagus, white chocolate, and when people don’t use the Oxford comma. I look forward to sharing all things Beaufort Books with you!

Until next time!

Judy BEAUlume

Spencer Hill Press is now reopen to submissions

Tuesday, January 18th, 2022

After a brief hiatus, we are so excited to announce that we are once again open to submissions!

Finding the right home for your work takes time and effort, and we are excited to be part of your journey. We do currently accept manuscript submissions but we have a few criteria that we ask you to follow when you submit to us. Failure to follow our submission guidelines may result in rejection of your book. Spencer Hill Press focuses on fiction, particularly YA and Romance. We are not accepting Urban Fantasy or Middle-Grade submissions at this time. We are particularly interested in books that are series. We do not accept manuscripts that are not complete.

How do I submit?

All submissions can be sent to spencerhill@beaufortbooks.com. Before doing so, please review the following submission instructions closely.

What should my submission include?

  • A cover letter with a little bit about yourself and how you came to write the book.
  • A synopsis of your book. Keep it direct, simple, and under one page (300 – 400 words).
  • The target audience for your book and how you believe your book appeals to that market.
  • A list of relevant social media contacts including bloggers, any traditional media, and/or organizations that would help in the promotion and publicity of your book.
  • All of your contact details so we can get back to you.
  • A minimum of three sample chapters or 50 pages or you may submit the full manuscript.

Is there any genre you do not accept?

  • Poetry
  • Educational material
  • Nonfiction
  • Children’s
  • Middle Grade
  • Fantasy
  • Historical Fiction (unless it is YA or Romance)
  • Graphic Novels

When and how will I hear back?

Due to the volume of submissions, response time may take 16 weeks or more. No acknowledgment of receipt will be sent. Submissions will be reviewed in order of receipt, and we will contact you following our review. Spencer Hill Press will not discuss submissions over the phone. We are looking forward to reading your submission!

Senior Spring, COVID Edition

Wednesday, April 15th, 2020

Monday, Monday 9, 12:31 p.m.: I receive an email from my university’s president announcing that all in-person classes are suspended until March 27. The university encourages us to return home for the next three weeks. At around 7 p.m., I arrive home from the Beaufort office and pack my bags, joking with my roommates about how we may not ever see each other again. We laugh and they tell me about how students have been relaxing all day, knowing that classes for the next two days are canceled entirely. My dad picks me up and I leave my dorm for what I believe will be an extra-long Spring Break.

Tuesday, March 10, 4:35 p.m.: I receive another email from school. This one demands that all students who are able to leave campus housing immediately, and I wonder if there were too many parties on campus last night or if there is actually something to worry about. Rumors start to swirl about classes being online until after Easter. The idea is frustrating, but not the worst thing that could happen.

Wednesday, March 11, 9:45 p.m.: Another email. All students studying abroad, including those at the university’s London campus, have been called home in light of developing quarantine measures and travel restrictions. All on-campus events are canceled through March 29. I receive a frantic email from a member of an on-campus organization that I lead; she tells me she is not going to be able to meet an assignment deadline because she is packing for her 6 a.m. flight. It is nearly midnight.

Thursday, March 12: No emails are sent out today. My friends and I track the decisions being made by other schools. Some have suspended in-person instruction for two or three weeks. Others have switched to online classes for the rest of the semester. I still believe that we will return to campus, at least for the last few weeks of classes and for final exams.

Friday, March 13, 8:59 p.m.: I receive the email that breaks my heart: the university has decided to finish the semester online. We will not be able to return to campus. All events for the remainder of the year, including our end-of-semester celebrations, are canceled. Decisions about graduation have yet to be made, but no promises are made. Sitting in my childhood bedroom, I cry. My friends call me and we cry together. Hours later, I tell my parents the news and cry again.

In a matter of four days, my college experience was turned upside down. Everything I had grown to love—being on my own, living within walking distance of friends from all over the country, lounging on the lawn on campus, sharing coffee with friends in the library at 2 a.m., having Manhattan a train stop away—was taken away before I could even process it. All of a sudden, I was back at home trying to find a desk to do my work at.

This is not the way I planned to end things. As a senior, this was supposed to be the best part of my college career. I was excited to hand off my positions to underclassmen. I was excited to attend awards ceremonies. I was excited to watch the sunrise from the football field the morning of graduation. I was excited to do everything one last time, knowing that it would be the last time.

Now, as I sit at home wishing I had taken more pictures of campus and of my friends, I can’t help but think about all the things I will not get to do. I have been trying to balance this sadness with the little joys of everyday life, but it is not an easy task. One thing that has helped me is making a daily list of what I am grateful for. These lists often include things like having a safe home, having a healthy and loving family, and having good WiFi and my boyfriend’s Netflix password. While it doesn’t feel like much, I know that it is far more than what others have. For each and every thing on my list, I am truly thankful.

Stay healthy and until next time,

Charlotte Beaurontё

This is a shared blog post for Beaufort Books and Spencer Hill Press.

Iconic Women of Literature

Monday, March 9th, 2020

In celebration of International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month, I’ve decided to reflect on some iconic female figures in literature.  Each of these individuals offers her own interpretation of what it is to be a woman and provides us with valuable lessons that we can implement—even if just in little ways—into our everyday lives.

Jo March in Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women

As one of the most popular coming-of-age stories to date, Little Women offers plenty of lessons in love, charity, and compassion.  Jo March, the ‘boy’ of the group, adds a fourth and equally important value to the list: independence.  Despite the expectations of women at the time, Jo happily pursues her career in writing and is in no rush to find a husband.  She decides to transform Plumfield into a private school on her own and is never discouraged from chasing her dreams out of fear of appearing unladylike.  Although Jo ultimately settles down with Professor Bhaer, she does so on her own terms, showing readers that women can maintain their independence no matter where their lives lead them.

Denver in Toni Morrison’s Beloved

While she is not the main character in Toni Morrison’s chilling novel, Denver is nonetheless an important one.  Concerned by her mother’s deteriorating health and mental state, Denver leaves her home after twelve years of confinement to search for help.  With no guidance and minimal education, Denver finds her old teacher, Lady Jones, and is not only able to return home with food and supplies but also find a job for herself.  Denver’s strength is no small feat. She must defy her mother’s previous orders, venture out into the world without aid, and finally admit to Beloved’s malignancy—despite the fact that Denver believes she is her sister’s spirit—in order to save her mother’s life.

Jane Eyre in Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre 

Brontë’s Jane Eyre describes the hardships and struggles of the title character, an orphan brought up largely by her cruel aunt and an abusive headmaster.  Jane exhibits admirable bravery throughout the book. From leaving Lowood to become a governess to fleeing Thornfield to returning to profess her undying love for Rochester, Jane constantly follows her instincts, even when she does not have an exact plan.  Known for her iconic line, “I am no bird; and no net ensnares me,” Jane Eyre offers a depiction of personal bravery that all people can emulate.

Maya Angelou in her memoir I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings 

Maya Angelou’s I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings recounts the countless instances of racism, trauma, and horror that Angelou endured throughout her young life.  Despite such innumerable atrocities, Angelou’s memoir is a portrait of her own perseverance. She emerges stronger every step of the way, with a new lesson learned or another harsh reality accepted.  In the end, Angelou depicts herself blossoming as a confident, young mother and a strong, driven woman.

Happy Women’s History Month! Until next time, 

Charlotte Beaurontё

This is a shared blog post for Beaufort Books and Spencer Hill Press.

“All my heart is yours,” Books

Wednesday, February 5th, 2020
In my opinion, Brooklyn Bridge Park offers one of the prettiest views in the city.

Hello readers!

 I am one of the new interns for Beaufort Books and Spencer Hill Press for the next few months!  I am very excited to share my thoughts, experiences, and, of course, good reads with you from time to time.  As a lover of classic literature, I’ll be going by the nom-de-plume Charlotte Beaurontё.  Jane Eyre was one of my favorite books from high school and it helped me understand why “the classics” are so everlasting.

Seeing as this is my first blog post, I find it fitting to offer a brief introduction of myself.  For the past four years, I have spent most of my time in New York going to school. I truly believe that New York City is a center of all things, and I love having easy access to so many museums, libraries, parks, and neighborhoods all at once.  While I live in the Bronx, my weekend travels often bring me to SoHo and Greenwich Village to relax in Washington Square Park, do a little window shopping, or scope out my new favorite coffee shop. Speaking of coffee, I would not be here without it.  I am a firm believer that coffee is its own food group, and the quickest way to my heart is a La Colombe latte.

When I’m not in the city, I’m home in New Jersey spending time with my family.  We are avid hockey fans (Let’s go Devils!) and love attending games together. My siblings and I all played different sports growing up, which perhaps explains my minor competitive streak (that or the fact that I’m the middle child). We also have an adorable West Highland terrier, Bella, who is the true favorite child, whether my parents will admit it or not.

While I often feel like I am running from one activity to the next, I love to make time to slow down, light some candles, and curl up with a good book.  I am constantly looking for new places to read and hope to explore some new libraries this semester.  My favorite thing about books is the fact that they allow you to learn about different cultures, lifestyles, time periods, and even worlds that you might not otherwise be able to.  While I’m a sucker for classics, I love the increasing levels of diversity in modern publishing. I hope to see this trend continue and am interested to watch how the industry changes.

Whenever I visit The Strand Bookstore in lower Manhattan, I spent a great deal of my time (and money) in the poetry section.

I can’t wait to explore all facets of publishing at Beaufort this semester and am looking forward to sharing my experiences with you!

Until next time, 

Charlotte Beaurontё

This is a shared blog post for Beaufort Books and Spencer Hill Press. 

Take a Chance On Me

Thursday, December 12th, 2019

As I’ve started to reflect on my time here at Spencer Hill and Beaufort Books, I’ve been remembering just how quickly the opportunity came to fruition. It had been less than a week since I moved from the middle of Oklahoma to a new apartment in Brooklyn in the hopes of securing my first internship in publishing. My entire family thought I was crazy, and I wouldn’t be surprised to learn they had taken bets on when I would return home. In fact, the thought of working in publishing hadn’t even occurred to me until I was already six months out of college, and it felt like I was racing the metaphorical clock to get entry-level publishing experience before it was “too late.” Though I have since learned that publishing is a very accepting industry that welcomes newcomers of all ages with open arms, I still spent every day scouring BookJobs for any opportunities I may have missed.

I was tending to my battered ego after a string of rejection letters came in (all in one day, to make matters worse) when I noticed a brand new posting for a fall internship at Beaufort Books and Spencer Hill. I applied, and within a week I was sitting on the phone with Karen, discussing Beaufort’s catalogue and the various opportunities I could take advantage of as a potential intern for Spencer Hill Press and Beaufort Books. Karen and Megan took a chance on me, and by the next Tuesday I was sitting in Spencer Hill’s Flatiron District office as their newest intern.

It all still feels like a blur, but I couldn’t imagine a better way to be introduced to the publishing industry. Though I’m incredibly sad to be leaving SHP and its talented team of editors, I take solace in the fact that I gained an invaluable, first-hand look at what it takes to transform a rough manuscript into a polished final book, that I am never more than a quick train ride away, and that there are dozens of Spencer Hill and Beaufort titles that are still to be read.

I hate to say goodbye, but all good things must eventually come to an end. It feels fitting to wrap up with one of the most popular quotes from the character that inspired my pseudonym.

“Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgment that something else is more important than fear. The brave may not live forever, but the cautious do not live at all. From now on you’ll be traveling the road between who you think you are and who you can be. The key is to allow yourself to make the journey.”

-Meg Cabot, The Princess Diaries

I am forever grateful to you, readers, for joining me on my journey at Beaufort Books and Spencer Hill Press!

Cheers,

Mia ThermoBEAUlis

This is a shared blog post for Beaufort Books and Spencer Hill Press. 

This is Farewell

Wednesday, December 11th, 2019

“What we call the beginning is often the end. And to make an end is to make a beginning. The end is where we start from.”

Four months have never passed so quickly. When I started at Beaufort Books and Spencer Hill Press in September, it felt like I had all the time in the world to soak up the experience of being a publishing intern. How naïve of me. New York City is so fast-paced that 14 weeks seem to go by in mere seconds. Nevertheless, in these 14 weeks, I have gained valuable experience and knowledge working with truly impressive and wonderful people. Taking a book from manuscript to publication is an arduous undertaking, but the people at Beaufort Books and Spencer Hill Press do it with grace and skill. I am thankful to have had the opportunity to learn from them, and parting ways with them is bittersweet.

Leaving New York City is equally as hard. I have gained so much from this incredible city. The confidence of navigating an often confusing and delayed train system. The determination of pushing through crowds of tourists when you’re late. The list goes on. Being here during the holidays has been a dream too! Christmas has always been my favorite holiday, and being here in the City to see all the lights and decorations has only deepened this sentiment. Of one thing I am certain, I will be leaving a part of my heart in this city when I go, but I know that I will be back soon.

I figured that before I say goodbye, I should probably leave you all with my recommendations of things to do in NYC. Check them out below!

  1. Get free tickets to Late Night with Seth Meyers or another talk show

Sign up for a 1iota account to be put on the waitlist for a plethora of shows and events happening in New York. I went in early December to Late Night with Seth Meyers and saw Saoirse Ronan (Ladybird) and Alex Borstein (The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel)!

2. Take a walk around Brooklyn Heights/DUMBO

I lived in Brooklyn Heights during my stint in the City, and it was such a great place to be. The neighborhood has tons of restaurants, beautiful brownstones, and is a short walk from the Promenade where you can get million-dollar views of the city skyline. Right next door is DUMBO, another great neighborhood with tons to do and incredible views.

3. Visit Times Square. Just go early

If you want to visit this tourist attraction without the crowds, I recommend going around 9 AM and not during the holidays. I went early in the morning at the beginning of November. No massive crowds. No lines at the Disney store. It was glorious.

4. See a Broadway show

I managed to see TEN shows on Broadway during my four months. I kept the costs minimal by entering the lotteries and joining the rush lines for plays that I wanted to see. My top recommendation is Jagged Little Pill. Alanis Morisette’s iconic album inspired the musical. It was a marvelous and emotional ride.

5. Leave the City

Although I love New York, there are so many amazing places that are just a short train ride away! I went to Connecticut to visit friends and enjoyed the change in pace from New York. Mystic, CT, is a quaint little town on the coast that is a perfect place to escape from the hustle and bustle of the City. There are also beautiful places in upstate New York that are close by.

Well, dear readers, the time has come. Goodbyes are so bittersweet, but I am excited about what’s next for me. Thank you for joining me on this journey. I hope all of you have a joyous holiday season and a blessed 2020! Love hard, read often!

With gratitude,

Captain Beaumerica

This is a shared post with Beaufort Books.

A Book-Filled Weekend

Tuesday, October 1st, 2019
The Brooklyn Book Festival 2019

Cheers, readers! I’m Beaufort and Spencer Hill’s second intern for Fall 2019. For the remainder of the semester, I will be going by the alias Mia ThermoBEAUlis in honor of my all-time favorite author, Meg Cabot, and her most popular character to date. Growing up, Meg Cabot’s colorful, creative, and always slightly disheveled protagonists strongly resonated with me, and the fact that every Meg Cabot book I own has been read to the point of near destruction serves as proof.

It’s crazy to think I’m already approaching my 2-month mark since starting my internship with Beaufort and Spencer Hill. Fortunately, there have been plenty of exciting projects to keep me busy, which is why I’m just now getting to my introductory blog post. 

While I’ve been an avid reader my entire life, I’m considerably new to the publishing world. With the exceptions of the Harry Potter series and a few classics by Roald Dahl, it always felt like I was the only book lover among my friends growing up. It wasn’t until I stepped into my first screenwriting class my freshman year of college that I knew what it was like to be among other eager storytellers.

Moving to New York feels like freshman year all over again. It’s been equally thrilling and terrifying to be surrounded by people who live and breathe books. I finally feel at home, but every day I’m in the Beaufort office brings new challenges and reminds me just how little I knew about the publishing industry before starting the internship.

A look inside the used bookstore

I love that each day in the Beaufort office brings opportunities to learn something new about the publishing industry, and that indoctrination continued with a few book-related occurrences two weekends ago. On Friday, while in Philadelphia, I got lost on my way to dinner and wound up at an inconspicuous used bookstore. The storefront was unmarked and from the front room, it appeared to consist of just five bookshelves stuffed with old CD’s and dusty self-help titles. I was about to ask the store owner if he had any fiction books when I saw a small entryway that opened up to another tiny room that was packed with books. Each secret room led to another, with each room getting progressively bigger and home to more obscure titles, stacked wherever the owner could find space.

At the very back of the store was one bookshelf filled with antique books. For just $10, I grabbed three different antique books, each published in the 1920s. While any bookstore is great in my book (yes, pun intended), the challenge of searching through piles of pre-loved stories makes bookstores like the one in Philadelphia a rarity that should be preserved.

On that Sunday, I stopped by the Brooklyn Book Festival. If you’ve been before, you know how palpable the energy is among the authors, publishers, and festival attendees. Whether it was a Big 5 publisher, an indie from a small town in Minnesota, or a local bookstore from Brooklyn, each table was swarming with authors, publishers, booksellers, and devoted readers, all looking to discuss the transformations the publishing industry is undergoing and the new books about to hit the market. I even had the opportunity to stop by and say hello to some of the publishing professionals I’ve heard about while working at Beaufort. Going into the festival I had no idea what to expect, so to say I was pleasantly surprised is an understatement.

If anything, this weekend reinforced my love for books and my desire to work in publishing. I can’t wait to see what the next few months with Beaufort and Spencer Hill bring!

Until next time,

Amelia Mignonette ThermoBEAUlis Renaldi, Princess of Genovia Intern at Beaufort Books.

This is a shared blog post for Beaufort Books and Spencer Hill Press. 

Welcome to New York!

Friday, September 6th, 2019
Manhattan skyline, August 2019

Hello fellow book lovers!

I am the newest intern here at Beaufort Books & Spencer Hill Press! Over the next four months, you’ll be seeing periodic updates on the blog about my latest bookish adventures and NYC experiences. For this brief time as a blogger, I’ll be going full James Bond and using the alias of Captain Beaumerica (I am a Marvel fiend and cannot be stopped). I am so thrilled to share my thoughts, musings, and lessons learned with you all!

I think it is only appropriate that this first post serves as an introduction to myself. Below you’ll find a list of a few of my favorite things.

Favorite Book:

One thing to know about me? I will never lie to you. I have so many favorite books. I’m not a parent, but I imagine that choosing your favorite book is not unlike trying to choose your favorite child. For the sake of time and your sanity, I won’t list all my favorites, but here is my default:

Divergent by Veronica Roth – This book isn’t a groundbreaking novel with an ultra-diverse cast, nor is it an underrated gem that everyone will love, but as a lost middle schooler this book was exactly what I needed to read. It brought me comfort and guidance during that complicated time of adolescence. It was an influential book that shaped the rest of my school experience. I could talk for hours about the first book in this series and the injustice of the film adaptation, but instead I will just encourage you to read it for yourself. Come share in the heartache.

Favorite Movie:

This probably won’t come as a surprise, but I have several favorite movies… Here’s a few:

The Way Way Back – A coming-of-age story starring Steve Carrell and Toni Collette. This film is so heartwarming and emotional. It will always hold a special place in my heart.

The Truman Show – I love Jim Carey. He did a phenomenal job in this movie, but honestly, when does he not?

The Entire Marvel Cinematic Universe – Captain Marvel. Black Panther. Iron Man. Too many to name. I love them all with the passion of a thousand Suns.

Favorite Place:
In May of 2019, I spent two weeks in Southern Oregon and Northern California. They are easily my favorite places in the World. If I could hole up in the California Redwoods to write for the rest of my life, I absolutely would. These massive trees brought tears to my eyes and made me emotional in a way that I never thought trees could. I consider it a travesty that the Redwoods are not on the official Wonders of the World list.

Favorite Thing About NYC (so far):

The subway. I consider myself I great driver, but I highly dislike it. Not having to drive everyday is a blessing that I never want to lose. Also, the bookstores. So. Many. Bookstores.  

That’s it for now! I hope you enjoyed learning a bit about me! I am so excited to be a part of the Beaufort team and interact with you via Beaufort social media. Check back soon for more updates!

Your Favorite Hero,

Captain Beaumerica

This is a shared blog post for Beaufort Books and Spencer Hill Press.

Always Wandering, Never Lost

Thursday, August 1st, 2019

Hello Readers!

This summer has been a whirlwind of exciting things, both at work and outside of it. One of my favorite things about New York City is that there’s always something new to explore. I spent every weekend hopping from park to thrift shop to ice cream place and I definitely haven’t been everywhere! Maybe it’s only because I’m here for the summer, but I feel like I could stay for years and still discover new and interesting places every week. Even simple things like walking up 6th avenue instead of 5th on the way to work change the experience of a day so much. Not to say that a one-block difference is as far afield as I went this summer—quite the opposite. I went all the way up to the Cloisters and down to Coney Island, exploring pretty much every bookstore I passed along the way. As much as I loved the things I planned (the Coney Island Cyclone holds up to the hype!), some of my favorite things happened purely by chance, like stumbling across a street fair or seeing the same adorable dog on the subway and later on Governor’s Island. From conceptual ice cream bars to hole-in-the-wall record stores, I never knew what to expect when I set out wandering.

In much the same way, I never knew quite what to expect when I came into the Beaufort & Spencer Hill office—and I’m just as happy about that! From visiting printers to proofreading manuscripts to hunting down addresses for reviewers, it’s been a busy summer, and I’ve enjoyed it all. I came in thinking I wanted to go into publishing, but now I know I do. I like the everyday chaos of working at a small publisher, from first submissions, corrections, and cover design, to ARC buzz, the excitement of pub date, and royalty statements. This might be a bit obvious, but it really does give me an appreciation for how many little projects go into the making of every book on my shelf. And I’ve not only gotten to see how things work, I’ve gotten to do many of them. I came up with keywords to help our titles be found in search. I’ve helped out with submissions. I finally learned how to use Instagram and Twitter! I’ve learned a lot this summer and I’m genuinely excited to explore the industry further.

When I go back to school in a couple of weeks, I know I’ll miss a lot about New York (like the many excellent restaurants on my block), but hopefully I’ll be back one day. And until then, I can always read about it in one of many fantastic books.

Sea you sometime,

Beauseidon

This is a shared blog post for Beaufort Books and Spencer Hill Press.

Random Things or Summertime Sadness!

Thursday, July 11th, 2019

A year and a half ago, a few days before Christmas, my father died. It was awful. It is awful. I struggle with that loss. Maybe this isn’t the greatest way to start this post? Oh, well! Onward. In my book One of the Guys, Toni Valentine’s father has died and she too struggles with it. It sucks.

Death tends to force reflection and lesson-learning, so here are a few observations about grief and death and horrible stuff like that:

  1. Happy moments feel sad. Yep. This is a thing. As my kids grow, I often think, “Man, my dad’s missing this.” There I am, in the middle of a July 4th celebration, sun bright, sprinkler on, laughter all around me, feeling sad. Gross, right? It’s okay though. The sadness mixes with the happy stuff; it doesn’t overwrite it. Eventually I think we all get to a point where sadness tries to slither into everything because we’ve lost something, tinting moments with her blue shade, and we learn to accept her presence and even say, “Fine. Come on in, Sadness. It’s a beautiful day today. Have a seat. Be quiet. I want to hear the laughter.”
  2. No one knows what to say…that’s okay. Yeah, we don’t know what to say. It’s weird, right? Shouldn’t we have that figured out by now? Death isn’t, like, new. What do you say to someone when they’ve experienced huge and awful loss? The reason we don’t know what to say or do is because there’s nothing we can say or do that will make it better. We’ve got to sit in the pain. Personally, I felt like acknowledgement was enough. Like, don’t pretend it didn’t happen, don’t avoid it, don’t pretend everything’s fine. Don’t act like someone should get it over it, no matter how much time has passed. I mean, it would be cool if there was a magic spell to make it feel better. One word, one flick of the wand, something. There isn’t. Acknowledgement is the best thing — for me. It could be different for someone else, but I like a simple, “I see your pain. I’m sorry.”
  3. My dad will miss my next book. I’ve been working on a new book for some time now and when I’m finished (I think I can, I think I can) he’s going to miss it. This sucks. I hate it.
  4. Life goes on, but nothing remains the same, including you. Death changes the living, you know. Sigh.

There you go, folks! A super duper happy-go-lucky post for the summer! I think it’s important to remember that even during these bright summer days, don’t feel ashamed if you have Sadness inviting herself over, for whatever reason, as long as she doesn’t overwrite all the good stuff…because the good stuff, it’s still there, bobbing to the surface, always.

If you want to read more, please check out
https://www.spencerhillpress.com/lisa-aldin/ .

Welcome to NYC, BookExpo Style

Tuesday, June 18th, 2019

Hello!

I’m Beaufort’s newest intern here to report back that, yes, BookExpo is exactly as cool as our previous post promises!

I’ve never been part of the publishing world before, but I had heard tell of a magical event where all the industry people came together to network and best of all—talk about books! I was very excited when Beaufort asked if I’d like to go to this paradise, so of course I said yes.

And BookExpo and BookCon did not disappoint! I hit the ground running on this internship, starting my first day by helping set up the booth. For the next three days I helped out there, meeting authors and helping with signings, and of course, exploring this mecca of the book world.

The Javits Center was full of larger-than-life posters of books and authors. It was like they were movie stars—some of whom I got to meet in real life! Just sharing a room with people whose books I’ve admired since I was little is enough to make my nerdy heart swoon, let alone all of the other fantastic things going on.

It was really interesting to see all the different people who came to BookExpo—not just publishers, but librarians, booksellers, and educators as well. I saw a few people from around where I live and said hello. It was nice to see a little bit of home in the big city.

But of course, for a young hopeful such as myself, it was great to see the variety of publishers there. From the big four to small presses, academics to picture books, a wide range of organizations came to BookExpo. Everyone was excited to show off the projects they’d been working on and even standing in line, attendees would talk about the exciting things they’d done or were planning to do during the convention.

BookExpo was a really great way to kick off my internship because not only did I get to be dazzled by all of the cool things happening in the industry, I also got to know the Beaufort & Spencer Hill teams better than I would have just starting behind the desk.

Signing off for now,
Beauseidon

P.S. These are some of the cool tote bags I got while I was there!

This is a shared blog post for Beaufort Books and Spencer Hill Press.

Random Things or Why Authors Love Librarians!

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2019

L.B. Simmons goes to TLA YART

I was so excited when Spencer Hill told me I was asked to attend the Texas Library Association’s Young Adult Roundtable in April for the second year in a row!

Prior to the event, all the authors are assigned a table number. We lined up as a group and made our way to the room, and when the doors opened, hoots and hollers and applause from the librarians echoed all around us.

And that’s when the real fun started.

Imagine sitting at a round table filled with 6 or 7 librarians, each of them waiting to hear about your work.  It would seem to be a nerve-wracking experience, but it’s quite the opposite.

As with my previous experience, the energy from the librarians at this event was incredibly positive and contagious, which allowed me to discuss my upcoming release, We, the Wildflowers with ease. I prefaced my discussion by stating that though it deals with some pretty heavy topics, We, the Wildflowers is a relatable journey of four friends, meant to inspire teens and give them a sense of hope in a world so often filled with ignorance and hate. I went on to describe the story in detail, doing my best to leave out spoilers. I was spurred on by the nods of agreement and satisfied smiles received with each new layer of the story revealed.

Once I was through, it was the other author’s turn to discuss her book, which was really interesting as it was a young adult fantasy, which I love to read. When she was finished, it was the librarians’ turn to ask us questions, which they did until the announcement was made that our time was up and instructing us to move to the next table. Then the process would start over all over again.

It was such a surreal experience seeing the anticipation in their eyes and the eager grins on their faces as we walked to our assigned tables. Typically, the authors are assigned in pairs, so as I took my seat and introduced myself, another author did the same opposite me. 

I was completely overwhelmed by the response received for the We, the Wildflowers storyline. And to be honest, I was touched by the fact that their interest in this book stemmed from the fact that it would positively impact teens. They seemed very vested in the opportunity to get books on their shelves that wouldn’t only motivate reading, but possibly change lives while doing it.

Bottom line, they CARE about their readers and they show it by stocking their shelves with impactful reading material. I was utterly floored by their personal connection to teens as we discussed current issues that affect them and ways that We, the Wildflowers confronted them unapologetically. 

The event is one of my favorites for that reason. I think the importance of librarians is often overlooked, especially when it comes to teen readers. They are responsible for supplying today’s youth with thought provoking, impactful books that will help mold them into the adults they will soon become. That’s a lot of responsibility when it comes down to it, and librarians do so without complaint, and all too often, without recognition.

It’s my utmost honor to share my books with these wonderful individuals. So, thank you, Texas Library Association, for giving me the opportunity to meet so many amazing librarians. The Young Adult Roundtable is such a wonderful event and I am honored to have been a part of it again this year.

Thank you for spending time with me on this blog post!

Visit my website https://www.lbsimmons.com/ or go to my author page at Spencer Hill Press https://www.spencerhillpress.com/l-b-simmons/

Bookish Dream Come True!

Friday, May 17th, 2019

Hello Readers!

It’s been a while since I’ve posted, but I wanted to share some exciting news. As most of you may know, BookExpo and BookCon are coming up soon, and I’ll be attending both for the very first time! Now this is exciting for several reasons, but for those of you who aren’t familiar with either, I’ll elaborate.

BookExpo is the publishing industry’s leading trade event. Publishers, booksellers, librarians, and tastemakers all gather to find out what’s new and happening with authors, the latest titles, distribution channels, and new technologies and trends. It’s a great space to network and make connections within the industry, keep up to date with the comings and goings of the publishing world, and if you have a business, it’s a great event to attend because you can learn how to give it an edge.

Equally exciting will be Unbound, the adjacent show and new exhibit floor dedicated to unique non-book items to help businesses grow: “aka” the goodies show. Let’s face it, though we love books, we also like the toys and trinkets that bookshops sell to accompany and enrich our book reading experience. I’ll have to bring a tote bag!Running concurrently to BooxExpo will be the New York Rights Fair, which is the international adult and children’s content and licensing marketplace. This is where rights professionals, publishers, acquisitions editors, agents, scouts, film producers, and other attendees do business, discuss rights sales and the distribution of content across all formats.

As an intern at a publishing house, I am extremely excited to see up close what happens at these trade shows because A) they’re not really open to the general public, unless you’re in the books business and B) they form the biggest and most important U.S. publishing event of the year.[

Between author panels and talks, and sessions meant to educate on the publishing business, book swag, and networking, this three-day-event is sure to be thrilling for book fanatics like me!

If you’re never been and can go, it’s an event you won’t want to miss. Be sure to stop by our booth and say hi!

BookExpo will take place May 29-31, 2019 at the Javits Center in NYC.

Wednesday, May 29: 12:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Thursday, May 30: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Friday, May 31: 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Just as BookExpo closes on Friday, BookCon opens on Saturday. Now BookCon is an entirely different atmosphere. But what is it? In their own words, “BookCon is the event where storytelling and pop culture collide.” One of my friends described it as “Comic Con for book nerds,” and I couldn’t agree more.

So, while BookExpo runs more on the business side of books, BookCon is tailored for all the readers and book fans out there. Open to the public, and targeting all ages, eager bibliophiles like me will have the opportunity to meet & greet authors, attend workshops and panels, and get all our favorite books autographed.

I’ve been living in NYC for almost three years, but this will be my first time attending (finally!).  For two years I have stared in awe (and felt very jealous…) of my friends’ hauls after attending. Though I will sadly be leaving this wonderful city in August, and I probably don’t need to add any more books to my packing list, I am anticipating eagerly all the fantastic reads I will leave the event with.

So, if you’re planning to attend, BookExpo (which I am hoping you are), you seriously CANNOT pass up on BookCon!

Sadly, weekend tickets are sold out, but you can still purchase tickets onsite & online. Adult tix go between $30-$45 depending on the day, and Kid tix (aged 6-12) are priced at $10 for either day.

BookCon will take place June 1-2, 2019 at the Javits Center in NYC.

Saturday, June 1: 10:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Sunday, June 2: 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM

I cannot wait for this fun-packed week to arrive! For more information on either event, please click on the links below.

www.bookexpoamerica.com

www.bookcon

Til’ next time, readers!

-Sir Arthur Conan Beauyle

This is a shared blog post for Beaufort Books and Spencer Hill Press.